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Entries about sailing

Sailing On and After Nine-Eleven

The Infamous Day


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Friends of ours (Charley and Sandy who have a boat like ours) were cruising up the Bay. They went from Mobjack to Onancock on the Virginia Eastern shore- pretty calm crossing. Then they went to Crisfield (Maryland Eastern shore) and the wind was on the nose and was pretty rough, but they enjoyed both stops. They were going to come over to Smith Creek to visit with us Monday 10 September, but were afraid that predicted thunderstorms would make it rough

Tuesday 11 September 2001

When the planes were crashing into the Twin Towers, I was on the internet using our only phone line. The TV was on in the other room but I wasn't watching it, nor was I paying much attention to it. Our daughter B was (and is) a pilot for AA, but she was flying out of Miami mostly to the Caribbean so even when I realized what was happening, I didn't worry.

She was actually in the air at the time on a flight from Miami to Philadelphia. She was grounded in Norfolk, and she tried to call me to tell me she was OK, but my phone was constantly busy. When she finally got connected she was quite annoyed.

Our friends had a rough trip coming across to see us, with big waves and the wind on the nose the whole way. We came down and met them at the marina,
Windstar at the dock

Windstar at the dock


and we decided that the weather was not good enough (and they didn't want to go out in it again so soon) for us to go up to Solomons tomorrow, so we took them to Evans for dinner, and we watched the news of the day on a TV there (we can't get any TV reception at Pt. Lookout Marina and they'd heard about the plane crashes as they were crossing and wanted to see what had gone on).

They got the fried Captain's dinner, and had too much to eat - they couldn't eat the soft shelled crab, and the crab cake because they ate their favorites first. I just had a grilled rockfish because I know how much I can eat. Bob got steamed shrimp and couldn't finish his either. Evans is still the best place I know to get seafood at reasonable prices.

Wednesday, 12 September 2001

We visited them on their boat.
WIndstar at the dock at our marina

WIndstar at the dock at our marina


Charley does really nice woodwork
Inside Windstar

Inside Windstar

Interior Windstar

Interior Windstar

Bookshelf under the bunk

Bookshelf under the bunk

Charlie and Sandy's bird

Charlie and Sandy's bird

Seat for the helmsman

Seat for the helmsman

After Charley checked on a leak that he was concerned about, and we had lunch (we ate the stuff left over from dinner the night before for lunch), we took them to the St. Clements Island Museum. St. Clements Island is the place where the Maryland settlers landed. It is up on the north shore of the Potomac, and has a big cross commemorating the one erected by the colonists. There are two piers (free) but I'm not sure how shallow a draft you'd need to get in there. There's nothing on the island now - it is just a park. [That was true in 2001 - but in 2008 the lighthouse was rebuilt] St. Clements was apparently a saint who drowned because he had an anchor around his neck.
The Little Red Schoolhouse which is on the grounds of the museum

The Little Red Schoolhouse which is on the grounds of the museum


I think D and B visited the museum with me a long time ago - probably in the 70s, but Bob had never been.
From the museum looking out toward St. Clements Island

From the museum looking out toward St. Clements Island


The Museum is on the shore, and costs $1 and shows a lot about the original trip on the Ark and Dove (and the reason for it), and some ecology of the region. Our friend Charley who grew up in VA said he wasn't used to the VA settlers being viewed as the bad guys so this was very educationalfor him. (the charters for the two colonies overlapped and the VA colony was very resentful of the MD settlers). The only photos I took inside the museum were of two lighthouse models
Blackistone Island Lighthouse which was on St. Clement's Island (the island name was changed to Blackistone Island at one point)

Blackistone Island Lighthouse which was on St. Clement's Island (the island name was changed to Blackistone Island at one point)

Ragged Point lighthouse which no longer exists

Ragged Point lighthouse which no longer exists


Bob's mercedes was making a grinding noise in the brakes, so we switched to my car. I think I have a mouse in there. It ate a hole in my big pink MOM beach towel that D gave me some years ago.

Then we went by car to Solomons to the museum there,
Ship Carpenters

Ship Carpenters


and toured the ecology section
Jellyfish

Jellyfish


with all the sharks teeth etc.
Diorama of sediment with shark's teeth

Diorama of sediment with shark's teeth


and the lighthouse.
Drum Point lighthouse

Drum Point lighthouse


I'd never been to the lighthouse before because the tickets to it used to be extra. We only had about a hour and a half there because we started late. Then we went back to the marina and Bob grilled salmon steaks, and we had green beans (from our garden) and corn on the cob and I had a swim in the pool, which was cold but relaxing. The mosquitos drove me back to the boat- they had followed my head around when the rest of me was in the water.

Thursday, 13 September 2001

We set out together for Solomons Island each on our own boat. We had a nice wind going down the Potomac, and I was able to take some pictures of their boat under sail.
Windstar under sail

Windstar under sail

Windstar under sail

Windstar under sail


We cut inside the horn off Pt. Lookout. They went farther out into the river - they are a faster boat than we are, but we know the region better than they do. After we got into the Bay the wind died, and we motored or motor sailed.

We got to Solomons (32.5 nm at an average speed of about 4.6 knots) about 3:30. We lost sight of our friends when they went into Solomons ahead of us. There was a Navy ship the TRANSPONDER anchored off the base keeping people the required distance offshore. We got fuel at Calvert Marina (it is usually the cheapest and also has a BoatUS discount), and Charley called us on the radio and said they were off our port quarter. They had gone up to the museum to take a picture of the lighthouse, as they'd forgotten their camera before. He said he heard the holding wasn't so hot opposite the museum, so he wanted to anchor in Mill Creek.

We both anchored between the G3 and G5. There was a big catamaran there also next to Charley and two other sailboats behind us. There was a sailing school apparently using Charley's boat as a mark. Our boats were swinging considerably on the anchors. Must have been the current, as there was no wind. I had some cell phone coverage and was able to email a short message out to let the family know what we were doing.

We ate dinner, and then we rowed over to their boat and I showed them the picture in the camera, but Bob flustered me so much that I couldn't find the cable to download them into the computer. They have a completely screened cockpit, so it's nice to sit and talk in the evening without worrying about mosquitos.
Outside of the cockpit enclosure when they were in the marina

Outside of the cockpit enclosure when they were in the marina

Cockpit enclosure

Cockpit enclosure


The kerosene anchor light that Bob made up (from a lens in an old porch light, plus a lantern that he got relatively inexpensively, worked great. The wind picked up in the night (we had the windmill on, so we know when that happens). I got up at 3:30 am and was able to download some emails from pocketmail.

Friday, 14 September 2001

The boats are now all faced the other way but are still swinging quite fast. In the morning (about 7:30) I heard a tug operator say that it was 42 knots from the north out in the bay. Even in this protected cove, we see winds of over 20 knots. Since Charley's next destination was Oxford, we decided not to go anywhere. I found the cable and downloaded the pictures into the computer and edited them.
Windstar anchored with Charlie on the bow

Windstar anchored with Charlie on the bow


It appears to me that both Charley and the catamaran are dragging. Charley confirmed this. It rains, but we are warm and dry in our enclosed cockpit. Ours arrangement is better for cold and rain,
Our cockpit enclosure with the "windows" rolled up

Our cockpit enclosure with the "windows" rolled up


and we can put screens in if we want to. I hear the Navy ship ask to come in to the pier (for crew rest) because they are being rolled quite a bit and the anchor is dragging.

One of the sailboats that is now in front of us left, and another catamaran came in and replaced it. The sailing school is now using our boat as a mark, and as we lie in the aft cabin, we can see them whishing by the ports. After I get up to look out the cockpit and maybe take a picture, they all go back in. A motor boat with a black hull came up and anchored between Charley's boat and ours without having anyone go up on the bow or even be in the cockpit. They also didn't back down on the anchor at all.

Charley decided to move his boat as he had dragged into the channel and didn't want the motor boat to drag down on him, so he came up and anchored next to us, and I took some more pictures of his boat. We went over and gave him our pictures on disk, and he gave us some he took of us.
RosalieAnn at anchor from Windstar

RosalieAnn at anchor from Windstar

Saturday 15 September 2001

It doesn't look good to go up the Bay before Monday, and I'd still have to get back by Weds. So we decide to go back today.

Coming out into the Patuxent is rough. The wind is right up the river and the waves knock us about quite a bit. As we get out to the mouth of the Patuxent, Bob puts up the jib, and when we turn downwind, he pulls out the main part way, and shuts off the motor. .

We surf down the bay doing 5.6 to 6 knots in 20-25 knots from the NE with basically just the jib and the main as a steadying sail and it is pretty comfortable. But we hear a warning on the radio about Gabrielle bringing 40 knot winds later that day which made me nervous.

So I was happy when we could turn into the Potomac at about 12:30 am, and the waves (which were not quite the same direction as the wind and about 4-5 feet) immediately get almost flat. We pull the sails in and motor. We are still seeing over 20 knots of wind but it shifts abruptly from the N to the NW. We get into the marina after 31.6 knots at an average speed of 5 knots, and we didn't have all the sails up at any time.

The wind is such that it pins us on the port side of the dock and no matter how hard I pull on the line, I can't pull us over into the slip. The dock rubs on the side of the boat (it is very high tide) and that makes Bob grumpy. However we do get tied up and get unloaded and get home by about 4.

When I logged on, I got 249 emails, and everything except one list was set to nomail. Not helped by people sending old editorials from the Vietnam war with tons of carbon copies, and Betty Schmidt-Miller's husband sending a photograph of the crash site, and people sending "pass it on" messages.

Sunday 16 September 2001

Bob found that one of the brake pads on his MB had broken in half, so he replaced the brakes, and I got a paper. I took the photos and
printed them out. Then we went over to where Charley had gone into a marina over in Solomons, and took them up to the grocery store and they took us out to dinner. I have to go get the mail and paper started again tomorrow.

I have a mammogram scheduled for Wednesday, and there is a Tricare seminar on Thursday.

Friday October 6, 2001
We went up to the Annapolis Boat SHow Oct 4-8, and met some friends that also had CSYs there
Annapolis boat show

Annapolis boat show

Saturday October 20, 2001

The Oyster Festival was Oct 20-21 and we had a kind of family reunion. Our daughter B and her husband and their two children flew up and rented a car. They drove up to my mother's house and brought her down for it. Our daughter D and her children plus their significant others were there, and our daughter E and her family with the new baby that was born in April and her in-laws, and even Rob drove up for it.
Playing frisbee

Playing frisbee


The children played frisbee in our back yard
Rob's kids

Rob's kids

E's son

E's son

D's youngest son

D's youngest son


- they had pony rides at the Oyster Festival.
Waiting for the pony ride

Waiting for the pony ride

Pony ride

Pony ride

E, daughter-in-law and Rob holding E's baby

E, daughter-in-law and Rob holding E's baby

E feeding the baby

E feeding the baby


Mother ate oyster stew
Mother at the end of the table

Mother at the end of the table


left to right - son-in-law, granddaughter's boyfriend, granddaughter, Daughter

left to right - son-in-law, granddaughter's boyfriend, granddaughter, Daughter

B and E's father-in-law

B and E's father-in-law

Mother with B and D shopping in the craft fair

Mother with B and D shopping in the craft fair


and she got to see the boat for the first time. E and D and their families went on home.
Son-in-law with two kids - eating with Bob

Son-in-law with two kids - eating with Bob

B and her daughter at dinner

B and her daughter at dinner

My mother at dinner

My mother at dinner


B and her family, Bob and me and my mother all went out to dinner afterward.

This was our last outing until we started down the ICW for the second time.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 20:28 Archived in USA Tagged museum sailing lighthouse chesapeake 9-11 solomons patuxent Comments (0)

ICW Trip 2001 Leg 7&8 Elizabeth City to Belhaven NC MM 135

Sailing up the Alligator River


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Friday 2 November 2001 (continued)

As we came out of the Pasquotank River into Albemarle Sound, we could see the line of boats to the east coming from the VA cut route. The waves, if any, were 3 to 6 inches and not 2 feet. There was about 8 or 9 knots of wind, so Bob put up the staysail. After we crossed Albemarle Sound, we entered the Alligator River. US Route 64 - one of the main highways going to the Outer Banks crosses near the mouth of the Alligator River on a Swing Bridge.
Map of Albemarle Sound and the Alligator River NWR

Map of Albemarle Sound and the Alligator River NWR


At the western end of the bridge is a gas station/souvenir /truck stop kind of place which is ALSO a marina. It's one of the cheapest docks on the ICW and also the fuel is a decent price. So right after we entered the Alligator River we went into the Alligator River Marina. We got fuel for $.959/gal. (It would have been cheaper if we had gotten more)

Aerial photo of the marina on the wall of the restaurant

Aerial photo of the marina on the wall of the restaurant

This marina has 34 transient slips, fixed docks with finger piers. They accept reservations, VISA/MC, Discover and Texaco. Pets are welcome - there is a dog walking area. Dockage is $1/ft/day with $4.00/day for 30 amp electric. There is free cable, but very few channels. The boaters lounge has 4 toilets and showers. There are also washers and dryers - cold water only. Pay phones are available and you can hook a laptop up to the internet provided you have an 800# you can use as there are no local numbers. Ice and propane are also for sale, and there is trash disposal, a launch ramp, grills, picnic area.

We had dinner at the truck stop. My son the trucker said a real truck stop would have dinners from $4 to 7 (which they pretty much did.) The menu was limited but the food was good. They also sell real ice cream for cones. The grille serves breakfast and lunch, and the grille cook is on duty until about 6 (so you have to eat dinner early). Sometimes the cook is a little grumpy.

You order, and go sit down and he brings your food out to you. Most of us had NC barbecue (vinegar based, not tomato based) but Lucette had a fried oyster sandwich. I'll have to remember that I'm not fond of NC BBQ. Dinner for the two of us was $15, and I got ice cream which was $1.52. While we ate, we watched the weather channel.

Saturday 3 November 2001

Everyone that was here last night (including the trawler with the cat that walked on a leash) has left. But we stayed here another night - it is cheap, and we want to get into Belhaven during the week so that things will be open. Bob washed the whole boat, Lucette and Max did their wash, and we got showers. You have to be careful when you take a shower. The lights are on a timer, and if you don't give yourself enough time you are likely to end up wet and soapy in the dark - there are NO WINDOWS in there.

We had dinner on the boat - Bob fried ham. Some more people came in - CASSIOPEIA from Canada, and POLARIS JACK - they were at a New York city marina on 9-11.

Sunday 4 November 2001 - Sailing up the Alligator on my 64th birthday

We got underway early. CASSIOPEIA left the marina first, and then just before we backed out of our slip, the Island Packet POLARIS JACK came out and then behind us was the power boat from Cobb Island.
01-747203.jpgAlligator River Swing Bridge

Alligator River Swing Bridge


We were all under the bridge by 7:20. It was cloudy, and the wind was about 18
knots, so after we went through the swing bridge Bob pulled out the jib and we motor sailed just like CASSEOPIA was doing.
Cassiopea sailing

Cassiopea sailing


I took a digital picture of CASSIOPEIA thinking I would give them a copy, but never saw them close up again (We did see them in Elliot's Cut in Charleston - but that wasn't a place we could stop and say Hi)

The Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge is on the east side of the Alligator (the marina is across the river on the west side). Much of it is accessible only by water

Are there actual alligators there?
Alligator River Refuge

Alligator River Refuge


The website says:

"Many species of wildlife call Alligator River home. The Refuge and it's surrounding waters support many resident and migratory species of wildlife. Of these, 48 are fish, 200 are birds, 48 are reptiles and amphibians, and 40 are mammals. The Refuge supports wildlife species which are important from both a regional and a national standpoint. Its large size and dense vegetation make the Refuge a haven for species which avoid man, such as the black bear. Also, the Refuge harbors many species adapted to living in forested habitat, as opposed to disturbed areas, such as field edges. Many neotropical migrants, such as prothonotary warblers, black-throated green warblers, prairie warblers, Swainson's warblers, worm-eating warblers, and red-eyed vireos, nest in the thick pocosin vegetation. Wood ducks, barred owls, and other cavity nesters seek the old trees found in this large expansive forested area."

There may be alligators or there may have been alligators in the river but I suspect they are relatively rare.

We turned into the Alligator Pungo canal at 10:15,
Edge of the canal

Edge of the canal


and furled the jib as there was no useful wind. This section of the canal is desolate as the trees are just recovering from having been burned over.
Banks of the canal

Banks of the canal


There are lots of stumps and downed trees which sometimes slide into the canal catch unwary boats and damage them. We went under the new fixed bridge.
New fixed bridge

New fixed bridge


I cooked bacon and Lucette made BLT sandwiches using the last of the rye bread from the bakery in Elizabeth City. After lunch, Bob put up the staysail. The sky cleared and it warmed up.

We were at Belhaven and went into Robb's marina by 3:00 pm, after 54.2 miles at an average of 6.8 mph.

Originally named Jack’s Neck, Belhaven was once a bustling industrial town with a half-dozen lumber companies and a branch of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad.
Old postcard view

Old postcard view


Now, Belhaven is a waterfront town.
Free dock near River Forest

Free dock near River Forest


The town dock can not be used overnight (according to the sign) and while it may be a rumor that boats there will be confiscated. I wouldn't want to test it. So you need to go into a marina or else anchor out.

Robb's Marina (The actual name of the marina was Marlen C. Robb & Son Boatyard & Marina.) was hated by many people partly because of the owner and/or former employee. We've stayed there 3 times because it is cheap, and have never had a problem with them. They had good cheap washing machines (75 cents a load and there was also a full laundromat 2 blocks away), nice showers, and would allow the use of the fax line to download email provided you had an 800 # as there are NO local ISPs.
Marina building

Marina building


The fuel was also pretty reasonable. All the docks were face docks (no slips), and the dock girl dragged the hoses down to you where you are at the dock. You didn't have to go to a separate fuel dock.

They also had a small marine store and it was easy to walk out into town to go to restaurants. There was a yard associated with the marina, where people often have to stop and have repairs because of dead heads etc in the Alligator Pungo Canal.

Since it was Sunday, the only place open for dinner was River's End, so we walked down there and had the buffet.
River Forest from the street

River Forest from the street


The River Forest house is very pretty. It dates from 1899, when John Aaron Wilkinson, President of J.L. Roper Lumber Company and Vice-President of Norfolk & Southern Railroad, began building the Victorian mansion known today as the River Forest Manor. Their website says:
Lobby

Lobby


Italian craftsmen were called in to carve the ornate ceilings, and by 1904, the mansion was complete – with carved oak mantels for each of the eleven fireplaces, sparkling cut glass leaded into windows, crystal chandeliers glittering from the ceilings, tapestry placed above the mahogany wainscoting in the dining room and two baths so large that they included oversized tubs for two. Eight years after the completion of his showplace, Wilkinson married a beautiful New Yorker who shared the house with him for many years.
River Forest door detail

River Forest door detail


"Specialties include many Southern style, mouth -watering dishes. Seafood delights such as crabmeat casserole, oyster fritters, and unique homemade sausages & desserts."

I actually found the buffet rather ordinary. The service was very rushed (but cheerful and apologetic) and the place was very crowded. It was OK, but not special. Two dinners were $39.97.

The marina was oversold, so they had to put people on the slip going into the travelift. There was a group of power boats that came in behind us - none of them had been down the ICW before except one guy who led a group down each year. There was also a sailboat from La Plata. I talked to the wife and she was a little concerned about the weather because it was her first time down the ICW.
At the dock at Robb's Marina

At the dock at Robb's Marina


The boat in front of us flying a pirate flag was having engine trouble, and Bob lent them some wrenches, but they had more serious problems. Bunch of guys - plenty of beer on that boat, but no food. And no charts for the places they intend to go. They don't even know about Frying Pan Shoals, and they were going out at Beaufort and come in the Cape Fear River.

Monday, 5 November 2001

The weather was predicted to be lively but the boat from La Plata left anyway. Bob did the wash, and we talked to folks. At about 12, we went to lunch at the Helmsman. and then went to Eva Blount Way's museum. This is about the only thing to "do" in town.
Bob sitting in front of museum with a sign

Bob sitting in front of museum with a sign

Flag on top of the Museum/town hall/police station

Flag on top of the Museum/town hall/police station


Eva Blount Way began her collection with a collection of buttons she inherited and she added to it until she had 80,000. I was particularly interested in the button collection because my grandmother also collected buttons.
The collection that started it all

The collection that started it all


I was also interested in the museum because Bob's family has Blounts in it way back.

Some of the 80,000 buttons at the museum

Some of the 80,000 buttons at the museum

The museum also includes old coins, shells, early American kitchenware, furniture, old farm tools, Civil War guns and World War helmets. Other items on display range from rocks and stones from Will Roger’s stable and the Wall of Jericho to three prenatal babies in jars (given to Mrs. Way by the town doctor), an 8 legged pig, several snakes killed by Mrs. Way; one stuffed, swallowing a wooden egg, another made into a necktie, a dress worn by a local 700-pound woman (she died in bed and had to be craned out the window), a ten-inch-wide ball of string (saved by Mrs. Way), a flea bride and groom (may be viewed with a magnifying glass), and jars of Mrs. Way's home canned products (now well over 30 years old). The museum sells souvenir cookbooks. Mrs. Way started showing her collection in her own home as a way to raise money for the Red Cross. It is now housed in the Town Hall which is on the National Register of Historic Landmarks.
Dollhouse

Dollhouse


The website says it is open 1-5 PM every day except Wednesday except on major holidays, but that doesn't include Saturday or Sunday, as it is not open on weekends. Also 1 pm is somewhat flexible - it opens when the attendant gets there. Free, but donations desired.
Town Hall, Police Station and Museum

Town Hall, Police Station and Museum


The museum is in what I think used to be a school. It is upstairs in what looks like it used to be the gym. Looking at the building, the entrance to the museum is the gray door up the steps on the left, the center door is the City Hall, and the right door is the Police Station. Next to the police station is one of about 3 pay phones in town.
Main street in front of the town hall

Main street in front of the town hall


The curator did get there and the museum was very interesting.

jcnctravel from VirtualTourist wrote:

The museum began as a theatre & was converted to gym. HS games were played there in the early 50's. My basketball team practiced there late 50's. Mrs. Way was my next door neighbor. I helped her preserve some of the snakes.


Max and Lucette weren't interested in the museum and didn't go. They took an electric golf cart to the Food Lion. There is no grocery store right in town. The Food Lion doesn't count even if it is in the town limits because it is a right good walk from a boat. Bob walked. On the way back, Max and Lucette came across Bob and Carol from a big ketch named CAROLINA which was anchored out. They had taken their propane bottle to be refilled and were struggling back to the boat with it, and Max and Lucette gave them a lift - it was pretty heavy and they were grateful.

Travel lift

Travel lift


A huge catamaran THE HIGHLANDER (dinghy was named (HAGGIS) which had been in the yard repairing their rudder which had been damaged and was being put back in the water.. Owner was a Scot, and two crew were Canadian and Australian. The boats in the travelift slip had to be moved in order for them to put this boat into the water. Later I found a web page about this boat called The Usual Suspects. I sent them a couple of my photos.

The HIGHLANDER on the Travel lift

The HIGHLANDER on the Travel lift

What happened (from the Usual Suspects site)

Minor disaster. On Mon in Alligator River Canal going south, a large fast barge going north moving north created large waves. Our starboard rudder crashed down on a deadhead bending it back & up into the hull. We had to lower the rudder post to clear it from the hull then proceeded to Robbs Boatyard in Belhaven,NC. They have a travel lift wide enough to lift Highlander. The result showed a wrecked rudder & a substantial hole in the hull, fortunately in a watertight section. We will get a replacement rudder from PDQ tomorrow & the glasswork should be completed by Sunday.

While we were in Belhaven, the small cruise ship AMERICAN EAGLE came in to the dock and to get fuel. (They gave them a discount on the fuel.) It takes the American Eagle quite a long time to fuel up. Many of the passengers got off to walk around town. Some got the electric carts. However there isn’t much to the town. There are only 3 or 4 pay phone booths in Belhaven, and there are all of two traffic lights and no gas stations right in town. So they soon came back to the ship.

There are a surprising number of privately owned electric cars in town. If you borrow a golf cart from a marina, note that the speed limit in town is 25 mph, even though the street is wide and there's little traffic. The police will ticket and tow the carts if they are out after dusk so you can't use one to go to dinner in the winter when dusk is around 5:30

American Eagle getting fuel

American Eagle getting fuel

We went to the Helmsman again that night and it cost the two of us $28.26 including tip.

After six hurricanes in four years descended upon the town of Belhaven - seven, if you consider that one of the storms visit twice - (Bertha, Fran, and Josephine and then Bonnie, Dennis twice, and Floyd), with flooding up to four feet, the town has gotten some kind of funding from FEMA to raise all the houses up.
The door post in the Helmsman with 6 high water marks on it - going from bottom to top is Isabel, Bonnie, Dennis, Bertha, Fran, Floyd

The door post in the Helmsman with 6 high water marks on it - going from bottom to top is Isabel, Bonnie, Dennis, Bertha, Fran, Floyd



Tuesday 6 November 2001

We got under way very early, (AMERICAN EAGLE came out of the channel just after us, and so did the HIGHLANDER - they both passed us pretty quickly)
Marker at river entrance with another boat

Marker at river entrance with another boat

Next stop Oriental

Posted by greatgrandmaR 10:39 Archived in USA Tagged marina museum sailing belhaven Comments (0)

ICW Trip 2001 Leg 27-28 Jumping out at Ft. Pierce to Miami

Pre- Christmas with the Grandkids


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2002 Heart Attack at Shroud Key & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Thursday 6 December 2001 - Melbourne to Ft. Pierce

Bob pulled the anchor and I motored out of the anchorage. He started the refrigeration, and pulled out the jib and then cooked bacon for himself (I just had a bagel).

We passed a junk rig which was apparently being pushed along by a dinghy.
Pushed by a dinghy

Pushed by a dinghy

Every time a power boat passed the depth sounder went crazy because they stirred up mud. We got through the shallow areas by Vero Beach - I didn't get a picture of the mooring field there. Bob had the sails out quite a bit.

We got to Ft. Pierce, and the bridge said she might have to give us 'a delay' because they were doing maintenance on the bridge. The car traffic was only one way because the maintenance trucks were parked on the bridge. Bob was turning around when the bridge horn sounded,
Fort Pierce North Bridge opening

Fort Pierce North Bridge opening


but we did get back in line and go through. We were tied up at Harbortown Marina by about 2:00.
Harbortown_Marina

Harbortown_Marina


We've gone 1060 nm so far.
My dinner

My dinner


We had dinner at the restaurant - we are currently trying to decide whether to go outside (the wind will be on the nose) or go inside again.

Friday 7 December 2001- CSY Day in Ft. Pierce

Talked to Sunny and Charlie of COSMOS and saw their updated bimini, which looks like a power boat thing to me.
Cosmos' bimini

Cosmos' bimini

Cosmos' chain plantes

Cosmos' chain plantes

Cosmos with RIB on the foredeck

Cosmos with RIB on the foredeck

Cosmos bow

Cosmos bow

Cosmos anchor winch

Cosmos anchor winch

Late in the day, Sunshine II came back from the yard. They have the same kind of bimini. I took some pictures of both boats.

Bob went out exploring on the bike.

Sunshine II- in boom furling

Sunshine II- in boom furling

We had the early bird special in the restaurant.

Cockpit decorated for Christmas

Cockpit decorated for Christmas

Saturday 8 December 2001- Christmas Light Parade

Our original plan was to leave today and go outside to Lake Worth, stay there a day or so and then go outside to Miami. But the winds are supposed to be gusty and from the SE and would be on the nose. There is supposed to be a cold front come through this afternoon though, and the winds are supposed to switch to the SW tonight and tomorrow. So we stayed an extra day. Bob did a load of wash, and I walked over to where AURORA is on F dock. I talked to a broker (not the one who listed the boat), and he let me into the security gate, and I went down and took some pictures of her and also of JOURNEY who was on the same dock

Journey (walkthrough CSY)

Journey (walkthrough CSY)

Journey anchor winch

Journey anchor winch

Journey fender board

Journey fender board

Journey - bow

Journey - bow


We had dinner on the boat, and then Sunny said the boat parade was that night, and the marina had chairs set up, so we went up to watch. We sat next to Ralph and Cindy of SUNSHINE II, and discussed a lot of stuff, and I finally persuaded Ralph to come over and see how we'd done the stuff on our boat. He was impressed with the pin rails,

A pinrail is strong rail at the side of the deck of a vessel, for holding the "pins" to which some of the running rigging is belayed (Belaying is to fasten (a rope) by winding around a pin or short rod inserted in a holder so that both ends of the rod are clear.) A pinrail is very useful for storing dock lines and similar items when they are not being used.

Ralph wanted the 'plans' for the pinrails. Bob laughed and said there were no plans. He drilled some holes in a piece of oak, and used coffee table legs for the 'pins'.

Bob adding a web ladder

Bob adding a web ladder

Pinrails with dock lines and the web ladder

Pinrails with dock lines and the web ladder

pinrail with a hose on one of them

pinrail with a hose on one of them


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Sunday 9 December 2001- Leaving Ft. Pierce

We decided just to go all the way down to Miami from here. Last year we went overnight from Miami to Lake Worth (started at about 17:30 and ended up about 12 hours later up at Lake Worth even though we sailed a good bit.), and then went during the day from Lake Worth to Ft. Pierce, so I figured we could do both in less than 24 hours.

Bob was up at 7 and returned the splitter and keys to the marina. We cast off in a relatively uneventful way and were leaving the marina by 7:30. The tide was going out the inlet, which pushed us pretty fast until we got to the end of the jetties and then it was bumpy as it had been last year on the way in. Light winds, - Bob put the main and staysail up and also the steaming cone (meaning we were motor sailing).

I went below and took some naps. Could hear the bridge tenders calling on the ICW. We are avoiding 30 some non-fixed bridges by going this way. Plus the ones that are between Ft. Lauderdale and Miami which we never do anyway because of the Julia Tuttle bridge which is only 56 feet high instead of 65 feet like it should be. We passed St. Lucie inlet about 11:45. Bob put up the jib, and then gave up on it. We saw a tug pulling something long and skinny - either a dock or some kind of pipeline.

Bob started looking at the water temperature to be sure we didn't get out into the Gulf Stream, which is warmer because it is going north (opposite direction to us) at 3 or 4 knots. It was up to 82 deg F, but then went back down again. After lunch, Bob decided he could take a nap, and he went and lay down for an hour. By 14:15 we were coming even with Jupiter Inlet.

At 16:00 we were off Lake Worth and the sun was going down.
Sunset over FL

Sunset over FL


Bob said to keep the boat about a mile off shore, and keep the wind at 30 to 45 deg. He had the radar set at 3 miles. (Normally in the ICW he sets it at 1/8th mile.) I would go with the wind on the port until we were in water of 30 to 40 feet, and then tack out until we were more than 1 mile from shore, and then repeat.

We heated up some stew, and then I went below to take another nap. Apparently I only slept for about a hour and then something waked me. I came up into the cockpit and we sat there together until about 10 when I saw Bob yawn. I asked him if he couldn't sleep and he said no, but a bit later, he agreed that he was tired.

He first went into the aft cabin, but couldn't sleep there, so went up and slept in the bunk in the main saloon. We were still motor sailing with main and staysail.

All was well for awhile. Nothing frightening on the radar. Then I started hearing announcements. The US Navy was conducting hazardous surface and underwater exercises from Port Everglades (Ft. Lauderdale) to some place I didn't know. The CG had a zone around all passenger ships in Port Everglades and Government Cut (Miami), and pleasure craft were restricted. I didn't hear either announcement well, and we were approaching Ft. Lauderdale.

I saw a big ship and I saw their red, white and green lights. (When you see both red port and green starboard lights that means the ship is either heading for you-(green -white-red) or away from you (red-white-green).) I moved out from shore a bit, but didn't want to go too far out because of the Navy stuff. Then I saw just the white and green, so I figured they turned right and were going in the inlet. Then they shut off the green light and appeared to stop. A little bit later they turned on the deck lights. I guess they anchored or picked up a mooring.

At the same time, there was a tug and tow was coming north, but he was on the other side of the ship, so I figured I didn't have to worry.

The Navy made another announcement and said to contact them on channel 88, so I tried that and didn't get an answer, and then I tried 16, and didn't get an answer there either. I was now south of Ft. Lauderdale. The Navy gave the announcement again. I switched to the new radio and this time when I went to call, I overshot channel 88 and discovered that there was an 88A. Called on that channel, and the Navy answered and told me that if we were in less than 100 feet of water, there was no problem.

Monday 10 December 2001- Arriving in Miami

Eventually the wind came around more east, and we were sailing pretty well. Bob woke up about 2:30, and I briefed him, and then went down and fell asleep in the aft cabin. About 4:30 am, he came down and poked me. I came up and fixed the computer screen (the Toshiba is going bananas), and called the CG on the radio to ask about coming in to Government Cut (Miami). I heard that we should call on channel 15, but it was channel 16, and I think I waked the guy up.

Finally another guy came on and said that if we went south of Dodge Island in Fisherman's Channel, we would be OK as far as the restricted zone was concerned.

Bob was very nervous and I finally said that usually I was at the wheel here and he was taking down the sails. He thought that was a wonderful idea, so he turned the helm over to me, and took the sails down. We went down the channel and under the Rickenbacker causeway, and anchored on the other side about 5:30 after 119 nm traveled at an average of 5.5 knots. It took 22 hours.

After we turned stuff off, I went below and fell asleep with my clothes on.

Bob got up about sunrise and took down the steaming cone, but did not turn off the anchor light.

We got up about 7:30, and about 8 or 9 I started calling marinas. No room at Dinner Key and they wouldn't know anything else until 1 pm. No room at Crandon Park. So I called Miamarina, and they said yes they had space. But they didn't sell fuel.

So we picked up the anchor and went to Crandon Park, and got fuel, Crandon diesel is 99 cents/gal.

There is a way to get from the RIckenbacker Causeway to Crandon Park without going all the way down to Bear Cut, and it only makes our depth alarm go off once. But there was a guy anchored in this channel. After we passed him going in and were going to pass him coming out, he moved

Then went to Miamarina.
Miami River

Miami River

large_00309532298720110308183436146.jpg07653482.jpg00309532298720110308183437804.jpgEntrance channel to marina

Entrance channel to marina


Miamarina is right in the middle of downtown. The AA arena is on the north,
AA Arena from Miamarina

AA Arena from Miamarina


the big cruise ship docks are right across Dodge Island to the east,
Cruise_ships on the north side of Dodge Island

Cruise_ships on the north side of Dodge Island


there is a big mall area with lots of shops and restaurants to the west, and to the south are the big bank buildings and the Hard Rock. Miamarina is the same price as Dinner Key. ($1.25/ft). Cheaper than Miami Beach, and much nicer. No internet connection there but the price includes electricity, water and cable TV. Bob doesn't think much of the showers though, so we are showering at our daughter's.
RosalieAnn at MiaMarina

RosalieAnn at MiaMarina


We tied up in slip C9. It took Bob some time to put the boat in the slip so that I could get off. I went up and paid for 11 days - we will leave here on the 21st. Then we went back and had another nap.

When we finally roused ourselves, we went to dinner at the Hard Rock (I had a coupon from the AAA book).
Hard_Rock through the stays

Hard_Rock through the stays


There's a 60-foot rotating neon guitar on the roof so it's certainly visible. At the east end of the Bayside complex.
Hard Rock in Miami

Hard Rock in Miami


We were not in the mood for anything that required any effort to get to or to decide what to eat.I had previously been to one Hard Rock in Atlanta, but Bob had not been. He's not much of a rock music person. Dinner for the two of us on December 12, 2001 with the coupon was $35.95.

After which I called our son in Charleston (we are filing float plans with him so someone always knows where we are) and our daughter who lives in Miami.

Bob attached the TV cable, and we went to bed. Couldn't even stay awake to see the end of the football game.

Tuesday 11 December 2001- Settling In

Got up and ran the refrigeration and Bob went up to get local rental car numbers from the marina phone book. I called around for rates. Rented a car from Budget, which was on Bricknell Dr, just across the Miami RIver from us.

Bob walked up and picked up the car, and we went out to the BoatUS in north Miami to turn in the squashed fender (which got squashed at Isle of Palms, SC and won't hold air anymore). Got a new fender. Then went to AAA to pick up new maps and tour book for FL.

There is a definite lack of fast food restaurants on US Route 1 between downtown Miami and our daughter's place in SW 175th Street area. About the only place is Burger King, so we had lunch there
Selfie in the Burger King mirror

Selfie in the Burger King mirror


on the way to our daughters. This place had a playground for kids. The lunch for the two of us was under $9.00. She was working in the morning (she is an airline pilot).

We had dinner at our daughter's and then went back to the boat, ran the refrigeration and went to bed.

(Note - the refrigeration is not automatic. It can be run either with the engine or with shore power, but it has to be turned on and off manually and you can't just leave it on to run or it will freeze up.)

Although Bob hasn't been able to get the reindeer for the staysail area, we do have the boat decorated for Xmas. We have
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(1) Santa hats and candy canes around the cockpit.
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(2) The mast inside the salon is substituting for a tree, and
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(3) We have lighted angels on the staysail boom triangle.

We also have a wreath on the bow
Wreath on the bow

Wreath on the bow


and I have the wreath our grandson made hanging with the oil lamp over my bunk.
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Wednesday 12 December 2001

Got up and ran the refrigeration, and then Bob dropped me at our daughters house (she is working all day today.), and went down to the base at Homestead to the commissary. He also went to an RV store to pick up 12V light bulbs. They sell the same bulbs for 95 cents that West Marine wants $2.95 for. (Whenever something is designated as "marine" it is automatically more expensive.) I spent the day trying to fix the Toshiba (unsuccessful, but I did get the virus software updated), and uploading digital photos to Photoworks (successful, but takes a long time). Also took some photos of the grandkids.
Granddaughter - age 2

Granddaughter - age 2

Grandson - age 7

Grandson - age 7


Bob took our grandson to basketball practice and we ate dinner at our daughter's and drove back to the marina - discovered that there is construction at night on the route that was OK during the day.

Thursday 13 December 2001

Our daughter is off today, so we ran the refrigeration and then went to her house and I worked on the computer some more. We were held up on the way over by the Miami River drawbridge going up. Bob pointed out the car parked on the bridge (not the opening part obviously) which belonged to the bridge tender. He has his own parking space right there on the bridge.

Our daughter was shopping in the morning and she ended up behind us on the expressway. We ordered dinner from Ron's the local Cuban place.
Ron's cuban food

Ron's cuban food

Friday 14 December 2001 - Road Trip

We took the car and ran up to Ft. Lauderdale to go to Sailorman (a consignment marine store), but didn't have any luck there. Went to a couple of other local retail marine stores and bought some minor stuff.

Talked to one other CSY owner, and tried to contact another one, but he was (we found out later) out on his boat changing the oil. We ate lunch at Lester's (a diner) and came back to the marina. We went up to the mall and walked around
Looking_down from the second level

Looking_down from the second level


and had dinner
Food_court_and_check

Food_court_and_check


and ice cream up there, and watched the tour boats going in and out.

Saturday 15 December 2001

Bob ran the engine (to get it warm) and changed the oil. The marina has free disposal for oil. We went and saw our grandson's basketball game with our daughter and granddaughter, had dinner, and got back in time to see the tail end of the Miami boat parade. I thought the big Ft. Lauderdale one would be on TV, but it wasn't.

Sunday 16 December 2001 Early Christmas


We went to our daughter's and then went next door for brunch and the gift exchange for the kids. Our granddaughter (just 2) was wearing her choice of a dress (not the one our daughter wanted her to wear) and cowboy boots, but I didn't manage to get a picture of her in the boots which came off immediately she got there.

While the adults were making and eating brunch, the kids all went out (two age 5, grandson age 7, granddaughter age 2, and one age 3.5) and started playing in the sand that was in the yard
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with water from the hose and/or pool. They got very sandy.
Sandy child

Sandy child


They all had to be de-sanded, and dried off and redressed - this time in our daughter's choice of dress.
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I gave our daughter and son-in-law their presents, and they gave us theirs. We left in the afternoon and went back to the boat. Picked up a turkey at Publix on the way home.

Monday 17 December 2001 - Time to leave?

I woke up this morning with the sudden realization that I had meant to allow 3 days to get to Key West from here and had made the mistake of saying we'd be here until the 21st when we were due in Key West on the 22nd. I had meant that we'd be here until the 19th and leave on the 20th instead of here until the 20th and leave on the 21st.

Also Bob is getting antzy. I listen to the weather, and hear that people are taking a weather window to the Bahamas. So we decide to leave a day earlier than we originally thought we would.

Tuesday 18 December 2001- Last Day

We went to our daughter's in the afternoon and did the last bit of computer stuff, and then went with them to the Enchanted Forest for the evening with several of their friends. The rides were included in the admission, and I went on the bumper cars with our grandson, and on the ferris wheel. Our granddaughter was fearless about riding almost any ride.
Enchanted Forest

Enchanted Forest

Posted by greatgrandmaR 22:03 Archived in USA Tagged sailing miami ft_pierce pre-christmas_visit Comments (4)

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